5 Best Bowling Balls For Beginners

It can be difficult to choose your first bowling ball, but this article will simplify the process and get you on your way to bowling way more strikes.

You can easily get strike after strike and have the ball do most of the work for you. Dial-in your speed, swing, and release, and you will have no problems hitting that 200+ average that you dream about.

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4 Types Of Bowling Tapes And How To Use Them To Increase Your Average

Using bowling tape can make your release more consistent, and make your thumb fit properly. There are two types of bowling tape and both are incredibly useful. There is tape that goes inside your thumb hole, and tape that goes directly on your thumb. Both types of tape have their uses, but they are used quite differently. This article will discuss the different types of tape, the benefits of each kind, and how to apply/use bowling tape.

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How To Bowl A Hook

How to bowl a hook

Why throw a hook shot?

Throwing a hook shot gives you the best chance of getting a strike. To get a strike, you need to hit “the pocket” at an entry angle of 3-6 degrees. As you probably know, the lanes are covered with oil.  If you properly take advantage of the oil, you can have your ball skim across the oil pattern and hook inwards toward the pocket in order to get the entry angle that you need. Learning to throw a hook shot and get that entry angle is the number one thing that separates beginners from intermediate bowlers. Here’s how you do it.

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What is “The Pocket”?

Getting a strike is much more likely if your ball contacts the pins in “The Pocket”. For right-handed bowlers, the pocket is right in between the 1st and 3rd pins. For a left-handed bowler, the pocket is in between the 1st and 2nd pin. The picture below shows a ball just before impact with the pocket as thrown by a right-handed bowler.

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Oil On Bowling Lanes

If you watch closely, bowling balls actually “slide” down most of the lane. Near the end of the lane, the ball gains traction and begins to roll. This happens because the lanes are coated with a thin layer of oil. The invisible oil on the lanes is the source of complexity in bowling, and this article will teach you all about it.

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